Signs and Symptoms of Asthma

asthma word cloud

With 17.7 million (7.4%) Americans suffering from asthma, it’s important to be aware of the signs and symptoms of the disease. Emergency room visits due to asthma-related incidents total 1.8 million, proving how truly horrendous it can be. However, by knowing a little more about asthma, you can better know how to respond to the disease, potentially preventing a hospital visit in the future.

What is it?

Considered a long-term, or chronic, inflammatory lung disease, asthma essentially narrows the airways of the lungs, making it difficult to breathe.

One of the worst side effects of asthma is the asthma attack, caused when the bands of the muscle surrounding the airways are triggered to tighten. An asthma attack can escalate quickly, so it’s essential to know the signs and to seek help immediately.

What are the symptoms?

When someone is suffering from asthma, they often experience symptoms when the airways constrict. The symptoms include coughing (specifically at night), wheezing, difficulty breathing and tightness or pain in the chest. Some people may experience all of the above symptoms, while others may have different symptoms. An asthma attack will usually include more severe symptoms like difficult talking, feelings of panic, a pale, sweaty face and blue lips or fingernails.

How do I treat an attack?

Immediate treatment, usually involves the use of an inhaler prescribed by a doctor. If trouble breathing continues, you should call 911 immediately or follow your doctor’s recommendations.

To learn more about health-related topics, check our blog frequently for up-to-date information! At Denton Regional Urgent Care Center, we offer convenient access to the expert care you need right when you need it, even after hours or on the weekend. 

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you.

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4 Common Work Place Hazards

Work Place Safety

Most often people are worried about hitting deadlines or getting their job done when at the office. However, it’s important to think about safety at the workplace from time to time. Many people believe you have to be at a construction zone or working somewhere with heavy machinery to be at risk of occupational hazards; however, every working environment has its own health and safety hazards.

  • Communicable Diseases: Most people don’t consider diseases such as the cold and flu as an occupational hazard, but an outbreak can quickly cut down the number of available employees. If you’ve been diagnosed with a contagious illness and your doctor has recommended you stay home, don’t put others at risk by going into the office. If you do have to go into the office, consider wearing a face mask to avoid spreading the illness
  • Slips and Falls: While slipping and falling can happen in your own home, it is also considered an occupational hazard as offices regularly have wet floors and liquid spills. Be aware of slick areas and make sure you wear appropriate shoes at all times when exposed to areas that may be slippery.
  • Ergonomic Injuries: Most people sit at a desk for 8 hours a day. If you are one of those people, it’s a good idea to use a wrist rest and have support on your lower back when sitting. You should also try to have your legs touching the ground when you sit to prevent aches and pains.
  • Transportation Accidents: Not all workplace incidents happen inside the office. Commuting to and from work, especially when exhausted, can be an occupational hazard. Avoid making business calls while you drive.

If you or one of your employees has suffered a workplace injury, consider visiting Denton Regional Urgent Care. We offer a wide range of occupational health services to keep employees healthy and productive. From workplace injuries to post-accident drug screenings, we provide a convenient, low-cost alternative for non-emergent healthcare services.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you.

How to Treat a Minor Burn

iStock_64425093_LARGE.jpgIt’s easy to get a minor burn. Whether you’re grabbing something from the oven, straightening your hair or boiling water, there are numerous things inside your own home that can cause a minor burn. If you suffer from a minor burn, there are a few things you should do to ensure it heals quickly and does not get infected.

First off, it’s important to know what qualifies as a first-degree burn, second-degree burn and major burn. If you’ve received a first-degree burn, your skin will turn red, swell and be painful. Meanwhile, a second-degree burn will usually blister, turn red, swell and be abnormally painful. Finally, major burns are typically a result of a fire and are larger than 2 inches.

If you’ve received a first- or second-degree burn, you should remain calm and work quickly to cool the burn. Always use cool water, not ice, and keep the burned skin under the water for 10 to 15 minutes to alleviate the pain. If you are unable to use a steady flow of water, place a cool, clean cloth on the burn for 5 minutes.

Once the burn has cooled, the affected area should be cleaned with both soap and water. A thin layer of ointment, such as petroleum jelly or aloe vera, can sooth the wound and help heal the burn. Finally, an over-the-counter pain medication, such as Tylenol, Advil or Aleve, can help alleviate pain.

A minor burn can take as many as 3 weeks to heal. While the burn is healing, it may begin to itch; however, it’s important to the healing process that you do not scratch the wounded area. Burns are also susceptible to tetanus, so you should make sure your latest tetanus shot was no more than five years ago. If you begin to experience increased pain, redness, swelling, oozing or fever, you should seek medical attention immediately.

If you believe your burn needs medical attention, consider visiting Denton Regional Urgent Care Center. We offer convenient access to the expert care you need right when you need it, even after hours or on the weekend.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you.