Causes of Adult Earaches

iStock-487718626.jpgIt is more common for children to develop an earache, but adults can suffer from them as well. Although rarely serious, earaches can be miserable and extremely painful. When adults develop an ear infection, it is usually one of two categories: acute middle ear infections or outer ear infections. If you believe you are suffering from an earache, read below to find out the differences and where to seek treatment.

Outer Ear Infections aka Swimmer’s Ear

Commonly known as swimmer’s ear, an outer ear infection commonly affects swimmers who have been exposed to germs that grow in warm, moist conditions. Symptoms of an outer ear infection include ear redness, itchiness inside the ear, drainage from the ear, pain when moving the head and a fever.

If you’re suffering from an outer ear infection, it can usually be treated with antibiotic eardrops. Depending on how severe the infection is, a doctor may need to remove some pus and debris from inside the ear. To avoid swimmer’s ear, try drying your ears with a blow dryer (on the lowest setting) after you’ve been swimming.

Middle Ear Infections

Although most common in children, middle ear infections can plague adults as well. Any time fluid or bacteria gets trapped inside the ear, it leaves the ear at risk of an infection. A middle ear infection can be identified by a feeling of fullness or pressure in the ear, hearing loss, balance problems, ear pain, fever and drainage from the ear.

Most of the time, this type of ear infection can be easily treated; however, if you suffer from regular earaches, you should see a doctor to determine the root of the problem. To avoid middle ear infections, try to avoid cigarette smoke, don’t clean your ears with Q-tips and take a decongestant when time you have a cold, as suggested by your doctor.

If you suffer from recurrent ear infections, consider seeking medical care at Denton Regional Urgent Care. We offer convenient access to the expert care you need right when you need it, even after hours or on the weekend. 

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you.

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3 Ways to Care For Stitches

iStock-625202702.jpgStitches are given for a number of different reasons. If you’ve experienced a wound that is considered at risk of infection, you will likely require stitches. In order to avoid infection, even after stitches are received, it’s important that your wound is cared for and observed properly.

Keep Stitches Dry

Find out from your doctor how long you need to keep your wound dry. In most cases, it’s important to avoid scrubbing or soaking the wound for at least the first 48 hours. Your doctor will let you know when your bandage can be removed and when you can wash the wound to remove the crust.

Treat Your Bandages Properly

If your wound is in a place that is unlikely to get dirty or where clothing will not rub against it, you may not need a bandage. However, if a bandage is required, it’s important that it is changed every 24 hours or any time it gets wet or dirty. Ensure you are following care directions given by your medical professional.

Remember They Are Temporary

Stitches can seem miserable when they itch and feel irritated, but remember they will be removed soon. Most stitches are removed between 4 and 14 days, depending on their location. Your doctor will be able to determine how long they need to be left in based on the depth and size of the wound.

If you’ve suffered a wound that you believe may require stitches, consider visiting Denton Regional Urgent Care. We offer convenient access to the expert care you need right when you need it, even after hours or on the weekend.

 Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you.

What You Need To Know About Broken Bones

Broken arm -  thumb upWhat is a broken bone?

Although bones are extremely tough, they will split or break when they endure more pressure than they can stand. When any bone breaks, it is called a fracture. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it’s known as an open fracture or a compound fracture. A hairline crack in the bone that results from repeated forces against the bone is called a stress fracture.

Causes of a broken bone

So first, let’s determine what causes a bone to break. The main causes of broken bones are:

  • Falling from a height
  • Motor vehicle accidents
  • Direct blow
  • Repetitive forces, often causes by running

 

How is a broken bone treated?

A doctor will carefully examine the injury and determine the best type of treatment. The most common treatment for a fracture is cast immobilization, which will allow the broken bones to heal. In some cases, metal pins or screws need to be placed into the broken bone.

If you believe you or a loved one has suffered a broken bone, it’s important to seek medical attention immediately. Consider visiting Denton Regional Urgent Care, where we offer convenient access to the expert care you need right when you need it, even after hours or on the weekend.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you.

4 Common Work Place Hazards

Work Place Safety

Most often people are worried about hitting deadlines or getting their job done when at the office. However, it’s important to think about safety at the workplace from time to time. Many people believe you have to be at a construction zone or working somewhere with heavy machinery to be at risk of occupational hazards; however, every working environment has its own health and safety hazards.

  • Communicable Diseases: Most people don’t consider diseases such as the cold and flu as an occupational hazard, but an outbreak can quickly cut down the number of available employees. If you’ve been diagnosed with a contagious illness and your doctor has recommended you stay home, don’t put others at risk by going into the office. If you do have to go into the office, consider wearing a face mask to avoid spreading the illness
  • Slips and Falls: While slipping and falling can happen in your own home, it is also considered an occupational hazard as offices regularly have wet floors and liquid spills. Be aware of slick areas and make sure you wear appropriate shoes at all times when exposed to areas that may be slippery.
  • Ergonomic Injuries: Most people sit at a desk for 8 hours a day. If you are one of those people, it’s a good idea to use a wrist rest and have support on your lower back when sitting. You should also try to have your legs touching the ground when you sit to prevent aches and pains.
  • Transportation Accidents: Not all workplace incidents happen inside the office. Commuting to and from work, especially when exhausted, can be an occupational hazard. Avoid making business calls while you drive.

If you or one of your employees has suffered a workplace injury, consider visiting Denton Regional Urgent Care. We offer a wide range of occupational health services to keep employees healthy and productive. From workplace injuries to post-accident drug screenings, we provide a convenient, low-cost alternative for non-emergent healthcare services.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you.

How to Treat a Minor Burn

iStock_64425093_LARGE.jpgIt’s easy to get a minor burn. Whether you’re grabbing something from the oven, straightening your hair or boiling water, there are numerous things inside your own home that can cause a minor burn. If you suffer from a minor burn, there are a few things you should do to ensure it heals quickly and does not get infected.

First off, it’s important to know what qualifies as a first-degree burn, second-degree burn and major burn. If you’ve received a first-degree burn, your skin will turn red, swell and be painful. Meanwhile, a second-degree burn will usually blister, turn red, swell and be abnormally painful. Finally, major burns are typically a result of a fire and are larger than 2 inches.

If you’ve received a first- or second-degree burn, you should remain calm and work quickly to cool the burn. Always use cool water, not ice, and keep the burned skin under the water for 10 to 15 minutes to alleviate the pain. If you are unable to use a steady flow of water, place a cool, clean cloth on the burn for 5 minutes.

Once the burn has cooled, the affected area should be cleaned with both soap and water. A thin layer of ointment, such as petroleum jelly or aloe vera, can sooth the wound and help heal the burn. Finally, an over-the-counter pain medication, such as Tylenol, Advil or Aleve, can help alleviate pain.

A minor burn can take as many as 3 weeks to heal. While the burn is healing, it may begin to itch; however, it’s important to the healing process that you do not scratch the wounded area. Burns are also susceptible to tetanus, so you should make sure your latest tetanus shot was no more than five years ago. If you begin to experience increased pain, redness, swelling, oozing or fever, you should seek medical attention immediately.

If you believe your burn needs medical attention, consider visiting Denton Regional Urgent Care Center. We offer convenient access to the expert care you need right when you need it, even after hours or on the weekend.

Disclaimer: Patients’ health can vary. Always consult with a medical professional before taking medication, making health-related decisions or deciding if medical advice is right for you.